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Accreditation

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CEHS Office of Accreditation and Records

The CEHS Office of Accreditation and Records (OAR) facilitates and supports national accreditation and state academic program approval; coordinates assessments related to program continuous quality improvements; acquires, organizes and validates data to advise leadership; oversees the measurement of candidate and student learning outcomes; and is responsible for the preparation of institutional, state and national reports.

Accreditation

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education logoAccreditation is a process of external peer review in which institutions of higher learning are evaluated based on a comprehensive set of established standards and criteria. Accreditation is maintained through various state and national professional accrediting bodies. The process of program accreditation provides a means of continuous quality assurance and represent the ongoing dedication of WVU’s College of Education and Human Services to provide effective, high-quality professional programs and services that meet the needs of the local, regional and global community.

The accreditation of Educator Preparation Providers (EPPs) is granted by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, or CAEP. Through its accreditation process, CAEP assures the quality of educator preparation and supports continuous improvement in order to strengthen P-12 student learning. CEHS has long maintained its national accreditation through NCATE, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. NCATE was subsumed by CAEP in 2013, such that CAEP is now the current accrediting body for EPPs. Following our most recent accreditation review and site visit in March 2012, the Unit Accreditation Board determined that CEHS successfully met all NCATE standards at the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels. This accreditation decision indicates that our institution and its programs meet the rigorous standards set forth by the professional education community and has maintained continued accreditation status. Our current accreditation extends through December 2019.

Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) National Recognition

Many of the educator preparation programs within CEHS have program-specific accrediting agencies that require the periodic submission of progress reports. Known as Specialized Professional Associations (SPAs), these agencies require the preparation of “SPA reports” that are submitted to the SPA as well as to CAEP. For our CEHS education preparation programs, these SPAs include:

American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL)

  • Foreign Languages - Five-Year Master’s Program
  • Foreign Languages - MAC or Post-Baccalaureate
American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

Council for Exceptional Children (CEC)

  • Special Education - Gifted, Post-Baccalaureate
  • Special Education - Multicategorical, Post-Baccalaureate
  • Special Education - Preschool Special Needs, Post-Baccalaureate
  • Special Education - Severe Multiple Disabilities, Post-Baccalaureate
Council for Exceptional Children

International Literacy Association (ILA)

  • Literacy Education - Master's Program
International Literacy Association logo

National Association for Education of Young Children

  • Pre-School Education - Birth to Pre-K Baccalaureate
National Association for Education of Young Children

National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS)

  • Social Studies - Five-Year Master's Program
  • Social Studies - MAC or Post-Baccalaureate
National Council for the Social Studies

National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE)

  • Mathematics - Five-Year Master's Program
  • Mathematics - MAC or Post-Baccalaureate
  • Mathematics - WVUteach
National Council of Teachers of English

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

  • Biology - Five-Year Master's Program
  • Biology - MAC or Post-Baccalaureate
  • Chemistry - Five-Year Master's Program
  • Chemistry - MAC or Post-Baccalaureate
  • Chemistry - WVUteach
  • General Science - Five-Year Master's Program
  • General Science - MAC or Post-Baccalaureate
  • Physics - Five-Year Master's Program
  • Physics - MAC or Post-Baccalaureate
  • Physics - WVUteach
National Science Teachers Association

Professional Education Candidate and Completer Performance Data

CEHS is committed to the use of data to continually improve our programs. Each year, the EPP collects and analyzes data about our program and candidates who are preparing for careers as educators, educational leaders, school counselors and speech pathologists in order to document the effectiveness of and to continually improve our programs.

Assessment Data

CEHS is committed to the use of data to continually improve our programs. Each year, the EPP collects and analyzes data about our programs and candidates who are preparing for careers as educators, educational leaders, school counselors and speech pathologists, in order to document the effectiveness of and to continually improve our programs. In addition, our programs provide data for external review by agencies and organizations, such as national specialized and professional associations, the West Virginia Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Education, the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, U.S. News & World Report and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities. 

HEPC Exam Pass Rate (Fall 2017):

146 of 146 test takers passed the Teacher Education Praxis II (including CST and PLT).

Graph exhibiting a 100% pass rate of 146 HEPC exam takers West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission Logo

U.S. Department of Education Title II: Preparing, Training and Recruiting High Quality Teachers and Principals

US Department of Education logo

179 of  189 program completers passed the  ETS: Praxis exams in AY 16/17.

Comparison bar chart showing institutional and state praxis pass rates ETS Praxis logo

WVU is consistently outpacing the Statewide Pass Rate.  View Official Report


Accreditation of Graduate Counseling Programs

American Psychological Association

The PhD program in Counseling Psychology is fully accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) to provide doctoral-level education in counseling psychology.

For more information, please contact:

Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation
American Psychological Association
750 First Street NE
Washington, DC 20002-4242
Phone: 202-336-5979
Fax: 202-336-5978
E-mail: apaaccred@apa.org

Master of Arts in Counseling - Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)

Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs logo

This program is one of two counselor education programs in the state of West Virginia that is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

Master of Science in Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling - Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)

The Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling program was accredited as a dual specialty program in clinical rehabilitation counseling and clinical mental health counseling by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) in July 2017. One of only 23 such programs in the country, the WVU program was awarded full accreditation until 2024.

Those who graduated between December 2016 and July 2017 and have met the criteria for graduating from the CACREP program in Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling program are grandfathered into the designation. This means they can report having graduated from a CACREP program with a specialization in Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling and one in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. These distinctions are important in applying for certifications, licensures, and for some employment sites.

In the spring of 2013, the board members of the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) and CACREP directed their respective leaders to work toward developing a relationship between the two organizations that would protect and benefit students in rehabilitation counseling programs who were legitimately preparing counselors to work as independent mental health counseling practitioners. In 2015, they announced a merger of the two organizations with CACREP assuming the accreditation responsibilities of programs that have been CORE-accredited effective July 1, 2017.

This is one in a long line of firsts for the program. In August of 1955, one of seven federal grants available for establishing a graduate rehabilitation counselor education program under PL 565 was awarded to WVU. This was in response to the Vocational Rehabilitation Amendments (federal legislation) that established funding sources for college and university training of rehabilitation professionals. The rehabilitation counselor education program started in 1955 with the first students enrolled in January 1956 and the first graduating class in 1957.

In 1974, it was one of the first programs accredited by CORE. Students admitted in the fall of 1975 were the first who could report having graduated under the status of CORE accreditation.

For more information, please contact:
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-535-5990
Fax: 703-739-6209
http://www.cacrep.org/

Accreditation of Graduate Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Programs

Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology

The master’s program in speech-language pathology at West Virginia University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

The doctorate program in audiology at West Virginia University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard, #310, Rockville, MD 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.


Teacher Preparation Program

West Virginia University is one of the premier Educator Preparation Providers (EPPs) in the State. Nine Teacher Preparation Programs (TPPs) make up the EPP at WVU, and all nine strive to achieve the following:

  • providing students with excellent academic preparation and clinical environments,
  • fostering inclusive cultures, and
  • collaborating among prospective and practicing educators and other stakeholders to positively influence communities in the state, the country, and around the world.

For each TPP offered by the University, a Program Progression Chart is provided as a tool to visualize the progression that needs to be made in order to receive a degree to become a teacher/educator.

Each PPC has the same fundamental layout: 4 stages and 3 gateways. The stages represent the achievement milestones needed while a candidate is at WVU, while the gateways represent the requirements need to advance into the next stage.

Teacher progression chart showing stage A, admission to university and college; stage B, admission to the teacher preparation program - Gateway 1; stage C, requirements prior to student teaching - Gateway 2; stage D, required at exit from student teaching - Gateway 3

TTP-specific Program Progression Charts can be found below. The  WVU Academic Catalog is readily available online to view basic course information and descriptions. 

In academic year 2017/2018 alone, WVU students earned  342  endorsements.

These endorsements are licensing WVU students in a broad array of domains.  View 2017/18 Table of Endorsements.


Measures of Program Effectiveness

As part of our national accreditation process we are required to report eight measures of program effectiveness. The information provided below is organized by  CAEP Standard 5.4:

  1. Impact on P-12 Learning and Development
  2. Indicators of Student Learning and Teacher Effectiveness
  3. Employer Data
  4. Transition to Teaching Data
  5. Licensure Rate
  6. Graduation Rate
  7. Employment Rate of Completers Prepared as Educators
  8. Loan Default Rate

Impact on P-12 Learning and Development

172 first-year completers from our EPP were employed in West Virginia schools during the 2016-2017 academic year. 78 of these taught in grade levels where Smarter Balanced mathematics and reading tests were administered. The other 94 completers did not teach in a grade where Smarter Balanced was administered (preschool education, physical education). Thus, data was gathered on all schools where these tests were administered. Data provided by the state show the aggregated proficiency rate for grade levels that administer a mathematics and/or reading state achievement test at the schools where our completers are employed.

The school proficiency rate is aggregated for all grades in the areas of math and reading. The school proficiency rate where our completers are employed are compared to the state proficiency rate in math and reading. 
View Data Tables with Analysis

Indicators of Student Learning and Teacher Effectiveness

2016-17 First-Year Teachers Evidence for Student Learning 
Results of Ratings on Student Learning Goals 
Source: West Virginia Department of Education

Each first-year teacher was rated by a public-school administrator on the level of accomplishment at which the educator's students reached the established academic learning goal that was set by the first-year teacher. The State provided data for 48% of first-year teachers.

Results: A majority of first-year teachers at each school level (elementary, middle, high, special education centers) were rated at the two highest levels (Accomplished or Distinguished) by a public-school administrator for each learning goal. First-year teachers are expected to be at the Emerging level on the WV Evaluation Rubrics for teachers used in the WV teacher evaluation system.  View Data Table

Employer Data

Network for Excellence in Teaching logo

The Employer NExT survey is administered to administrators of our first-year teachers. The first data report from this survey is anticipated during the 2018-2019 school year.

Transition to Teaching Data

The Transition to Teaching Survey (TTS) by NExT is administered to first-year teachers throughout the state of West Virginia. The first data report from the spring 2017 administration included 50 responses from all first-year teachers who had completed their preparation from an EPP within the State of West Virginia. Given the format with which the report is given to us, we are unable to disaggregate WVU students from other state EPPs. However, the number of respondents from our EPP in this survey is proportionally the same as the number of completers that our EPP contributes to the state.

The aggregate data indicates that first-year teachers felt their teacher preparation program had prepared them well in curriculum, assessment, technology, and others, while also recommending the program to their peers. The Transition to Teaching NeXT survey uses a 4-point Likert scale: Disagree (1), Tend to Disagree (2), Tend to Agree (3), and Agree (4). The overall mean for the entire questionnaire was 3.51, meaning “Tend to Agree” and “Agree” were chosen for the majority of the questions asked. View Question and Response Analysis.

Bar chart illustrating result of transition to teaching survey: 3.63 curriculum, 3.49 assessment, 3.4 technology, 3.6 program recommendation, 3.48 other

Mean is given for each survey group. The survey used a 1 to 4 Likert scale.

Licensure Rate

In 2016-2017, the WVU EPP had 228 completers, of which 190 went on to receive licensure within one year of graduation, culminating in an 83.3% licensure rate. View Licensure Rate Tables.

Graduation Rate

In spring 2017, WVU graduated students with Education graduate degrees in art, music, Spanish, math, English, general science, biology, chemistry, social studies, special education, and elementary education, and undergraduate degrees in agriculture, art, physical education, music, elementary, social studies, English, math, and preschool, with all of these degrees culminating in a 99.4% graduation rate! View Detailed TPP- and Licensure-Specific Graduation Data.

Employment Rate of Completers Prepared as Educators

The following graphs display the employment status for the last three years of completers prepared as educators (2014-2015, 2015-2016, and 2016-2017). Graduates were contacted via phone or email to find out if they were employed as a full-time educator or employed elsewhere.

During the previous three years combined, more than 74% of our EPP completers found employment as a full-time educator, and more than 98% found full-time employment in some capacity (whether it be as an educator, substitute educator, graduate enrollment, military, or field outside of education). Over the 3-year span, only seven total respondents (1.3%) were found to not be employed full-time. View Detailed Employment Rate Report.

Full-Time Employment Rate of 98.7% represented with a pie chart Full-Time Educator Rate of 74.5% represented with a pie chart

Loan Default Rate

College student loan default rates are provided by the federal government. West Virginia University's loan default rate is below both the national rate as well as the state’s rate.

School Type 2016 Loan Default Rate
West Virginia University 8.0%
State of West Virginia: All Schools 14.6%
Nationally: Public Four-Year or more Schools      6.8%
Nationally: All Schools 10.1%

Case Study: The Preparation for Teacher Effectiveness

In addition to the measures provided within “Impact on P-12 Learning and Development” and “Indicators of Student Learning and Teacher Effectiveness”, four cases of “The Preparation for Teacher Effectiveness” study provide insight into how we prepare effective teachers.

The Preparation for Teacher Effectiveness Project

The EPP conducted a case study with graduates from our TPPs to obtain supplemental evidence of our completers’ impact on P-12 student growth.

The purpose of the case study is to examine the assessments administered by the EPP’s completers who are first-year teachers, so that the P-12 student growth that occurred within the completers' classrooms could be evaluated. Additionally, focus group interviews were conducted with the first-year teachers to gain their perceptions about assessment practices.

Our completers’ perceptions about assessment practices are important to understanding our first-year teachers’ preparedness for implementing assessments and for using test results to change instructional practices.

  • Two years of study
  • Four first-year teacher participants (WVU graduates)
  • Students of all ages and backgrounds
  • Exploration on teacher perceptions of assessment practices and student achievement

The strive to use test results to inform instructional practices!

Questions addressed by the Case Study

  • How do first-year teachers use results from state achievement tests?
  • Do first-year teachers feel prepared to create classroom assessments?
  • How do first-year teachers use the results from classroom assessments?
  • Do first-year teachers feel that there are areas of improvement they would like to address when using classroom assessments?

The participants from both focus group interviews responded with statements that reflected their understanding of the positive purpose for implementing assessment practices with their students. The results from the focus group interviews demonstrate that our completers are prepared to use assessments, have developed strategies to improve teacher-made assessments, have a strong understanding of the benefits of using assessments to inform instruction, and are interested in expanding their skills related to constructing and using assessments.

The participants from both case study groups provided lesson plans that included assessments to meet the lesson objective. The results indicate that our completers are prepared to construct and use assessments. For example, the completers used the results from the assessments to modify their instructional practices. Additionally, the information gained from using the performance gap reduction (PGR) scale analysis with the second group of case study participants was helpful in determining their impact on student growth.

View the full Case Study

"Assessment data not only monitors student growth, but also makes us accountable for student learning."
- First-year Teacher